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Taurus 738 TCP .380 Review

Taurus 738 TCP .380Taurus? Really? I never was a huge fan of Taurus. In fact, I thought I’d never own one. However, this little pocket package is quite appealing and something I don’t believe I’ll give up!

I began my search for a .380 pocket gun when the need became more pressing. Some days while at work and dressed with slacks and a dress shirt it became too difficult to hide my compacts or even single stacks chambered in 9mm or 45ACP, even with an inside the waistband tuckable holster. On these days I elected to keep the gun in my vehicle (an option I don’t like).

I started searching for the perfect gun for pocket carry and wanted to avoid the .380 cartridge at all costs. I explored the snub nosed revolvers (which I’ve had in the past) and those printed too much for pocket carry. I looked at the Sig line of the P938 and felt that the hammer was too prone to snag and it was just a touch too large for back pocket wallet style carry (and the safety was hard to manipulate reliably with my hands).

This led me right back to the, 380 pocket gun line up. It took much for me to swallow because I’ve always been a preacher of “carry the largest gun you can.” I came to realize that on these occasions the largest gun I could carry was a .380 pocket gun in a wallet style holster (so far seems to be the fastest to present from). So I began my search with a $400 budget in mind.

The lineup was the S&W Bodyguard, the Ruger LCP, Taurus TCP, and the Kel Tec P3AT (the Sig P238 was not considered because of the aforementioned concerns above). The Bodyguard (even being a die-hard S&W fan) had a trigger that left a little to be desired. However, it did have the best sights and second strike capabilities. It was also a tad larger than the competitors.

The Kel Tec was eliminated because I viewed the Ruger LCP as a slightly more refined version. So now it was a battle between the Ruger LCP and the Taurus TCP. It wasn’t until I read some reviews of how great the trigger was on the Taurus that I decided to even give it a look. Let me tell you, for a pocket gun this small (and inexpensive) the trigger truly is something to write home about. It is shorter than the LCP, lighter, smoother, and a tad crisper break. The Taurus also locks the slide back on an empty chamber while the LCP does not. Although this may seem like a trivial concern, I consider it be valuable for Type 3 malfunction clearing and general safe gun handling while at the range.

So I did it. I bought a Taurus. Not to say the Ruger is a “worse” gun because it absolutely isn’t. I just preferred the trigger and features of the Taurus. Off to the range!

At the range I fed it Blazer steel case ammo and never even cleaned the Taurus factory grease off. It ran smoothly with no hiccups even amongst some fellow shooters. The Taurus, despite its tiny size, is capable of more than acceptable accuracy. About 40 rounds were shot at the target pictured with one flyer (my first shot while learning the trigger). The remaining rounds were kept in a very nice group even when my shooting speed increased.

So far I am more than pleased. I found my pocket carry and backup gun for those deep concealment or grab-and-go days. My view of Taurus has changed. The TCP is a high quality firearm that should be highly considering when filling this niche! Bravo Taurus.

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