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Striker Fired Guns or Traditional Double Actions for Concealed Carry?

Glock took the American market by storm with the introduction of the Glock 17.

Why? Two reasons:

1. Ease of use
2. Reliability

Glock 17Smith and Wesson, who had a very strong presence in the law enforcement market, made extremely reliable semi-automatics. There was nothing “wrong” with them per se, but when Glock introduced the striker fired system, it revolutionized the trend in defensive weapon selection for both law enforcement and civilians alike.

Heckler and Koch, Smith & Wesson, and Sig Sauer all were top choices for law enforcement use. They made (and make) very quality, reliable guns. The issue was that new shooters took longer to become proficient with both their trigger and operating systems.

Sig Sauer P229Traditional double action guns require a long, heavy first trigger press that simultaneously cocks and releases the hammer which is essentially the same as a “double action” revolver. Subsequent shots are fired “single action” with a short, crisp trigger. The trigger’s only function is to release the hammer since the recoil of the slide cocks the hammer when cycling. This transition of roughly a 12lb trigger pull followed by a 4lb trigger pull takes a lot more training and repetition to become proficient with.

Then there is safety. When you administratively load a traditional double action you must rack the slide to successfully load a round into the chamber. The result you are left with is a gun in “single action” mode. One must safely lower the hammer using a de-cocking lever to return the weapon to “double action” mode which is how these firearms are intended to be carried. The same action of de-cocking must take place before re-holstering, or while moving for cover and so forth. The additional steps of de-cocking leaves more opportunities to miss a step causing safety concerns coupled with the difficulty mastering the traditional double action trigger system.

Glock’s “Safe Action” pistol remedied both of these matters. The same trigger pull experience (roughly 5.5lbs) is experienced through every trigger press. This means no de-cocking, and only one trigger system to learn. The result was that new shooters and seasoned shooters alike had a simpler operating platform to work with. This eliminated the need to “think” while in a gun fight and also helped ingrain quicker muscle memory and trigger control.

Since Glock’s introduction of the striker fired system, many companies have followed suit with the same operating platform of “same trigger pull each time.” Smith & Wesson, Springfield, Sig Sauer (soon to come), Ruger and many more have all developed similar style systems. It is without a doubt that a striker-fired system is both easier, faster, and more efficiently learned and mastered than a traditional double action. These systems are highly encouraged for concealed carry (new shooters or experienced) based on their simple operation. Train safe, train smart, and train simple.

Comments

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